The Longwood Medical and Academic Area

The LMA is a workforce powerhouse for the city and state.

68,000 workers

27,000 students

2.8 million patients annually

$672 million in state tax revenues annually

HAPPENINGS

  • Summer 2022
LONGWOOD COLLECTIVE INTRODUCES A TRANSPORTATION FRAMEWORK

The Longwood Collective’s new Transportation Framework is both a vision statement with guiding principles and goals and a dynamic toolkit for evaluating how well transportation proposals meet Longwood’s unique needs and priorities. It does this by assessing how a project impacts 12 top-priority metrics such as impact on emergency service routes, impact on single-seat transit rides for Longwood employees, and impact on walking and biking infrastructure.

In the Framework, the Longwood Collective lays out guiding principles for transportation in the LMA: that it is safe, convenient, and affordable for everyone who wants to work, learn, heal, and visit in the district; offers services and amenities that are as world-class and innovative as Longwood’s healthcare, research, and educational institutions; is clean, sustainable, and resilient; and prioritizes vulnerable populations and users. The report can be viewed here.

 

WHITE PAPER: A CASE STUDY OF MODE SHIFT IN THE LMA

The White Paper, “A Case Study in Robust Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Confronting Access Limitations at the Nation’s Pre-Eminent Medical, Academic and Cultural Campus,” documents the tremendous success achieved over the past 30 years in driving “mode shift”—people choosing to use public transit or walk or bike instead of driving—in the LMA, citing that the percentage of people driving to work in the LMA declined from 47% in 2002 to 30% more recently, all while the district added approximately 15,000 jobs and grew by almost seven million square feet.

Showcasing never-before-seen data, the White Paper also provides clear evidence that mode shift is reaching its natural limits given current transit infrastructure, and that further increasing transit ridership, walking, and biking by people traveling to, from, and through Longwood will require investments in new, high-capacity transportation infrastructure. Since 1990, the paper shows, transit demand has grown twice as fast as has increased transit-service availability through the expansions of bus, Green Line, and commuter rail service.

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Happenings